Briefs

Wrongfully convicted man awarded a Certificate of Innocence and more than $1.5 million

 

Lamonte McIntyre

Lamonte McIntyre, who was wrongfully convicted and served 23 years in prison for a double murder, on Monday received a Certificate of Innocence and more than $1.5 million in total compensation, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced.

Police arrested McIntyre in 1994 for the murders of Donald Ewing and Doniel Quinn.

A Wyandotte County Court ordered McIntyre’s release in 2017 after reviewing the case.

In the order, the court determined McIntyre “did not commit the crime or crimes for which he was convicted, nor was he an accessory or accomplice to the crime or crimes, nor did he suborn perjury, fabricate evidence or cause or bring about his conviction.”

McIntyre served 8,583 days in prison between April 1994 and October 2017.

As part of the agreement, the record of his arrest, conviction and DNA profile have been expunged.

In addition, McIntyre will receive counseling, permission to participate in state health benefits program in 2020 and 2021. He also will receive a waiver or tuition and fees at a postsecondary educational institution for the up to 130 credit hours.

 

“D.C. Sniper” Lee Malvo could be eligible for parole

Lee Boyd Malvo, “the D.C. Sniper, ” who is serving six life sentences, can be considered for parole after serving at least 20 years in prison since he committed the crimes before he turned 18, according to a new law signed Monday by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam.

Lee Boyd Malvo

Malvo was 17 when he and John Allen Muhammad, a father figure, embarked on a nationwide killing spree in 2002, concluding in D.C., Virginia and Maryland in which 10 people were murdered and three were wounded.

Police arrested the two on October 24, 2002. A judge sentenced Malvo to prison March 10, 2004.

Muhammad, an honorably discharged Army veteran, was executed November 1, 2009, by lethal injection at Greensville Correctional Center in Virginia.

Malvo’s life sentence will remain in effect, though he will have a chance at parole in early 2024.

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