History

“Gone With the Wind” author paid the medical school tuition for Morehouse College students

By Frederick H. Lowe BlackmansStreet.Today HBO Max recently announced that it stopped showing “Gone With the Wind” because the academy awarding winning film, which is set in the antebellum South, the Civil War and Reconstruction, glosses over the brutality and mental cruelty of slavery. Recently in Bristol, England, Black Lives Matters protesters pulled down the statue of Edward Colston, the[Read More…]

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Black Lives Matter protesters tear down statue of the U.K.’s leading slave trader

By Frederick H. Lowe BlackmansStreet.Today Black Lives Matter protesters in the United Kingdom pulled the statue of Edward Colston, a 17th century slave trader, off its base in Bristol, England, and rolled it down the street before pushing it into the harbor to a watery grave to loud cheers, according to the BBC. The entire event was captured by photographers.[Read More…]

Booker T. Washington stamp issued in 1940

The Booker T. Washington stamp, the first stamp honoring an African American, was issued on April 7, 1940 by the Post Office Department, predecessor of the U.S. Postal Service, as part of its famous Americans series. Born a slave in Hale’s Ford, Virginia, Washington served as a role model for other struggling African Americans, and, as founder of Alabama’s Tuskegee[Read More…]

Court refuses to unseal grand jury testimony concerning 4 murders by white racists

By Frederick H. Lowe The U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta has refused to unseal Grand Jury testimony concerning the 1946 murders of two black couples in rural Georgia believed to have been put in killers’ crosshairs by Governor Eugene Talmadge, who needed to win the rural vote to secure his re-election in 1947 governor’s race. The Court of Appeals[Read More…]

Court refuses to unseal Grand Jury testimony concerning 4 murders by white racists

The U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta has refused to unseal Grand Jury testimony concerning the 1946 murders of two black couples in rural Georgia believed to have been put in killers’ crosshairs by Governor Eugene Talmadge who needed to win the rural vote to secure his re-election in 1947 governor’s race. The Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit[Read More…]

Law to make lynching a federal crime passes the House

Similar legislation has passed the U.S. Senate   By Frederick H. Lowe BlackmansStreet.Today The U.S. House of Representatives has passed legislation designating lynching, which was used by whites to murder and terrorize black men, women and children, a federal hate crime. The bill, (H.R. 6086), which was introduced by U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush of Chicago in 2018, passed the House[Read More…]

Frederick Douglass historic newspapers are now available online

By Frederick H. Lowe BlackmansStreet.Today   The Library of Congress is publishing for free online digitized copies of the Frederick Douglass Newspapers that date from 1847 to 1874. The papers are  North Star, Frederick Douglass’s Paper and the New National Era. There are 137 issues of The North Star, 220 issues of Frederick Douglass’ Paper and 211 issues of the[Read More…]

France gifted the Statue of Liberty to America in 1886 to celebrate the end of slavery

On August 20, 1619, the first black slaves were dragged in chains to America   Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, wants to change Emma Lazarus’s sonnet that begins with “Give Me Your Tired and Poor”… that is inscribed at the base of the Statue of Liberty to something less welcoming to the huddled masses yearning[Read More…]